Horatius Bonar

Had it not been for this [Christ’s] dying, grace and guilt could not have looked each other in the face; God and the sinner could not have come nigh; righteousness would have forbidden reconciliation; and righteousness, we know, is as divine and real a thing as love. Without this exception, it would not have been right for God to receive the sinner nor safe for the sinner to come. But now, mercy and truth have met together; now grace is righteousness, and righteousness is grace. This satisfies the sinner’s conscience, by showing him righteous love for the unrighteous and unlovable. It tells him, too, that the reconciliation brought about in this way shall never be disturbed, either in this life or that which is to come. It is righteous reconciliation, and will stand every test, as well as last throughout eternity. The peace of conscience thus secured will be trial-proof, sickness-proof, deathbed-proof, judgment-proof.

Charles P St-Onge

Immanuel will bring lasting, true peace. (Isa 7:14) Not just an end to physical war, although that is what we usually think of when we think of peace. No, this is a deeper peace. A peace between us and God. True reconciliation between the Creator and his creatures. Through Immanuel life for us and his death for us we will be at peace with God. This isn’t our doing. We didn’t make the peace.  We didn’t even take the first step.  God did.  Because that is God’s attitude toward us:  always seeking, always restoring, always saving.  Immanuel comes to show us that we matter, each and every one of us, to God.  Jesus Christ, our Lord, and God’s Son, is Immanuel – God with us.  Jesus was born a child and lived among us, died our death on the cross, all so that we would have peace with God, from this time forth and forever more.  The zeal of the Lord of Hosts has done this.